The Open Knowledge Foundation’s Open Data Index attempts to score the degree a country has opened several key datasets. In the United States, this is promulgated through data.gov site. The index measures ten categories—ranging from transportation timetables to releasing legislation—and nine criteria within each, such as whether the data exists through the timeliness.
The visualization resembles DNA sequencing. A simple color schema shows whether a criteria was met and an option to click for more information. The entire index, which consists of 60 countries, has a quality to be quickly scannable.
Other indexes, such as democracy index, is usually displayed as a global chloropleth, which seems to marginalize the smaller geographic areas or reinforce regional grouping. The OKFN visualization provides the same space and opportunity to each country, instead of tying it to its geography. The Open Knowledge Foundation’s Open Data Index attempts to score the degree a country has opened several key datasets. In the United States, this is promulgated through data.gov site. The index measures ten categories—ranging from transportation timetables to releasing legislation—and nine criteria within each, such as whether the data exists through the timeliness.
The visualization resembles DNA sequencing. A simple color schema shows whether a criteria was met and an option to click for more information. The entire index, which consists of 60 countries, has a quality to be quickly scannable.
Other indexes, such as democracy index, is usually displayed as a global chloropleth, which seems to marginalize the smaller geographic areas or reinforce regional grouping. The OKFN visualization provides the same space and opportunity to each country, instead of tying it to its geography.

The Open Knowledge Foundation’s Open Data Index attempts to score the degree a country has opened several key datasets. In the United States, this is promulgated through data.gov site. The index measures ten categories—ranging from transportation timetables to releasing legislation—and nine criteria within each, such as whether the data exists through the timeliness.

The visualization resembles DNA sequencing. A simple color schema shows whether a criteria was met and an option to click for more information. The entire index, which consists of 60 countries, has a quality to be quickly scannable.

Other indexes, such as democracy index, is usually displayed as a global chloropleth, which seems to marginalize the smaller geographic areas or reinforce regional grouping. The OKFN visualization provides the same space and opportunity to each country, instead of tying it to its geography.

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    Proud that UK is most open country.
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